SAC Events: 1 vs. 100

On Monday, October 14th, 2013, the Student Activities Council (SAC) hosted their take on television’s popular game show 1 vs. 100. SAC dished out over 300 dollars in prize money to 8 individual winners.

The rules of the game were as follows:

Everybody was given flash cards with the letters A, B, and C on them.

One player was selected from the audience to come on stage.

SAC projected multiple choice questions onto the screen. The participant on stage and all audience members selected an answer using their flash cards.

Everybody revealed their answers, and those who answered correctly continued to answer questions, while those who answered incorrectly were eliminated.

The game continued until the participant on stage incorrectly answered a question or until all audience members had been eliminated.

If the stage participant answered a question incorrectly, $25 would be raffled to an audience member who answered the question correctly.

If the stage participant eliminated the entire audience, he or she received $100.

The event brought in twenty people, and eleven rounds of 1 vs. 19 ensued. Overall, the attendees really enjoyed the event and Michael Osztrogonacz, an active member of SAC, called it a success. Many participants stated that this was the first SAC sponsored event they attended this year. They said they really enjoyed it and would attend more in the future.

Some of the highlights of the events featured sophomore biology major Hanson Tran successfully eliminating the entire audience and being the only contestant to win $100. After winning, I asked Hanson, “did you know you can buy over 15 foot-long Subway sandwiches with that?” to which he replied, “I was thinking the exact same thing.”

Another big winner from the event was Hanson’s roommate, Kevin Chen, a sophomore industrial design major. Kevin won 3 raffles as an audience member for a grand total of $75. Elated after winning his third raffle, he waved his arms in the air and shouted, “All I do is win, win, win no matter what!”

The event also featured a mildly embarrassing incident for Akshar Patel. Akshar was selected to go on stage and said to me, “I just don’t want to get the first question wrong.” He sat down on stage and the first question flashed onto the screen: “How many periods are in a hockey game?” Unfortunately, Akshar selected “two” as his answer, which was incorrect. As he despondently left the stage, he said, “Man, if that was differential equations, I would’ve had it in the bag, but hockey… nah, man, nah.” Vector readers, welcome to NJIT.

Pitambar Dayal

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