Fukurow

As frequent diners at Fukurow, the four of us decided it was time to write a review about the nearby Asian noodle bar that serves University Heights, located at 55 Bleeker Street. The origins of the name Fukurow, which is Japanese for “owl,” lends itself to the dozens of owl statuettes, posters, and clocks littered around the modern and eclectic restaurant. We entered Fukurow refreshed at the sight, recalling the first few days of university, getting to know one another in this restaurant, and sat down to eat. Here are our thoughts:

Katherine:

With the menu small enough as is, it is a bit more difficult to order a vegan dish at Fukurow: the only options are Shoyu Ramen and the edamame starter. The Shoyu ramen, which contains a soy sauce-based broth, doesn’t have much depth of flavor; I think it could be improved with a bit of vinegar for tartness or sesame oil for fattiness, to mimic that of a meat-based broth. I always ask for spice on the side and use the red pepper flakes provided on the tables, which greatly improves the flavor. Additionally, the noodles are soft without being chewy, unlike those at Ramen Gami. 

I also love the energy at Fukurow, with extremely kind and helpful waitstaff that always make a meal out with friends extremely fulfilling. Besides the uphill walk to the dorms with a broth-filled stomach, I always come away from Fukurow entirely satisfied. 

Birju

Having been raised in an Indian household, I ate spicy, homemade dishes almost every day growing up. Given my background, I am always very pleased with my experience at Fukurow. Supramen is a spicy Korean ramen with the chashu offering an even mix of vegetables, pork, and broth that leaves you satisfied, full, and craving more. The pork is nice and tender, displaying an even braise, and was infused with spices from the broth it was cooked in. The broth offers a spice that is certain to tingle your taste buds. 

But for someone who desires more spiciness, Fukurow offers chili pepper powder and chili oil at each of their tables. With a little bit of both—or maybe more than just a little— you will be satisfied, I assure you. Regardless of what you order, Fukurow is an amazing experience, and with the right people it can be even more enjoyable. It is definitely a place that can’t get old.

Michael

Fukurow provides an assortment of alternative appetizers if you feel like trying something different. I highly recommend the pork buns, which consists of two buns containing a hearty slab of chashu, bean sprouts, and some of their savory signature Fukurow sauce. The meat is cooked to perfection, the edges crisp, and the inside carefully marbled. Everything comes together to make an amazing dish that is a must-have every time I go. 

For those seeking adventure, the takoyaki might be of interest. This is a traditional Japanese snack: pancake balls with a core of octopus, topped with more Fukurow sauce and bonito flakes. Interestingly, these flakes are cut so thin and dry that when they are placed on the food, the warm steam causes them to appear to dance. 

After the initial amusement and confusion at this hypnotic display, I finally took my first bite and was instantly met with a pleasant surprise. The taste of sauce mixed with dough created a blend of sweet and savory flavors that was complemented when the tender octopus later revealed itself. Overall, any customer of Fukurow would be doing themselves a disservice by not ordering a starter or two before the entree.

Sandra

Growing up in a south Indian household, not only have I built up a very high spice tolerance, but I have also developed taste buds that long for their tolerance to be tested. Fukurow has done me some justice with its ramen dish, Supramen. 

Off the bat, I could not resist taking a picture for social media, and I am happy to note that the flavor of the ramen lived up to the aesthetics. The broth itself was at a fair spice level to begin with, allowing you to feel a warmth pass through your entire body with every spoonful. For those seeking a tasty ramen dish nearby, the Supramen at Fukurow is a dish you should definitely try. 

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Michael Makar

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